New to surfing in Oregon? Start here...
If you are a beginner, go to the Surfing Tips page for valuable info and then consult the Oregon Surf Guide pages for advice on where to surf.

Know before you go

For specific surf forecasts – including nearby cams – for many of Oregon's coastal towns and beaches you may use the drop down menu from the main navigation bar above or use the links below:

Cannon Beach
Short Sands (a.k.a. Oswald West State Park or Smugglers Cove)
Pacific City (a.k.a. Cape Kiwanda or Brohampton)
Lincoln City
Otter Rock
Newport
Florence
Winchester Bay
Coos Bay
Gold Beach
Brookings

 

Just give me NOAA, please... or buoy links and tide tables

Here are the North and South Coastal Waters Forecasts from the Nat. Weather Service. These reports are also included on the specific surf forecast location pages listed above.

Northern Oregon Report

Cape Shoalwater, WA to Florence, OR displayed below (if your browser supports iFrames). If you don't see the report below, here's the link: N Oregon report

Southern Oregon Report

Florence, OR to Point St. George, CA displayed below (if your browser supports iFrames). If you don't see the report below, here's the link: S Oregon report

Pacific Northwest Buoys

Moored buoys (ranging from 5-60 NM from shore) give data updated hourly on wind speed and direction, wave height, wave period, water and air temperatures, and more. C-MAN land stations are good for wind and tempature info. Checking buoys farther out to sea can give an indication of what is coming our way. Click here for the WA, OR and northern CA buoy map, or use these quick links to Oregon's buoys:

Tide Predictions

Go here for a basic tide table, or here for tide prediction graphs for the next few days on the Oregon coast. You should also get yourself one of the little printed tide books found at surf shops and other stores on the coast. They are super convenient to pack in your surf bag and/or glove box of your car.
 

Sea Surface Temperatures

If you have the luxury of choosing between a 5/3 or a 4/3, checking the surface temps might help you decide which one to pack to the beach on any given day. Sea surface temps can easliy swing 5° or more daily depending on the prevailing winds and currents (which cause upwelling), and up to 15° during an El Niño year. The moored buoys also report water temperature (see links above). Go here for a nice map of sea surface temps worldwide.